The impact of choosing the right images for a provocation!

I, see, think, feel and wonder...

I, see, think, feel and wonder…

provocation 3

My thinking…
When looking for images for our opening provocation for our unit, it occurred to me that the images we had used in our previous unit’s opening provocation were not as successful in provoking deep thinking. This time round I suggested to my team that we purposefully include images and info-graphics that showed contrasting situations and that would be challenging and require analysis. This time round we had about 50 images.

I was excited to see how our students would respond. We asked them to use the thinking routine ” I see, think, feel and wonder…” and record these on an index card. We gave them 10 minutes to study the images which were spread out on a long strip of paper stretching across the room. We expected them to work independently and in silence to give each student the time and space for thinking.

What happened?Students were so engaged by the images that they didn’t talk (apart from a few who occasionally were wondering allowed about the images). Students were so engaged that they needed an extra couple of minutes. Students didn’t just see the obvious, they made connections and comparisons. There was a depth to their thinking and wonderings they demonstrated that a deeper conceptual understanding had happened for most students. Their responses indicated that our choice of images were spot on for provoking thinking and wonderings directly related to our unit’s central idea and transdisciplinary theme.

What I learned …
Choosing the right images empowers students to become engaged and challenged grapple with ideas, make connections, make comparisons, connect personally and respond emotionally, build conceptual understanding and go beyond the obvious when wondering.

When the other two teachers repeated this provocation with their students, they had the same response from their group of students. Jina came to me excited about the impact the images had had on their students and we chatted excitedly about all we had learned from this experience.

Big understandings realised in my own learning…

Since the last time I posted, which was nearly two months ago, I have been tuned into my own learning like never before. My learning during this time can be compared to being on a roll when building a puzzle and several pieces fall into place in a short space of time and a bigger picture emerges. 

What has caused this avalanche of learning? A combination of things: my own intrinsic motivation driving me to get better at noticing and naming what was happening, reflecting on and refining my teaching pedagogy, professional learning with Sam and Chad, positive responses from both my students and Charlie’s students to our team teaching efforts, positive responses from my own students to the changes I have implemented in my teaching, talking to colleagues, professional reading and probably other things I haven’t yet identified.

So much has happened…

Essentially I have been trying to live the following quote as I realised the importance of doing so more than a year a go but it’s taken me this long to understand what that looks like and how that feels – and I’m still learning… “Stand aside for a while and leave room for learning, observe carefully what children do, and then, if you understand well, perhaps teaching will be different from before. “ Lori Malaguzzi

Some of the things I have learned from the changes I am implementing in my teaching practice…

  • team teaching opens up opportunities for me to notice things about my students’ learning while they are learning and allows me to meet individual needs more effectively
  • creating purposeful engagements and asking pertinent questions saves me time as I can support my students to make connections to knowledge and skills they have acquired which they can transfer and use in that context
  • creating simple learning engagements that tap into the essence of the learning and doing so in a way that students can connect to the concepts on a personal level, sets students up for powerful learning
  • taking the time to set the mood for learning saves time as students begin the task with the right intentions (sustaining the mood is not always easy though 🙂 )
  • knowing my students interests, strengths and insecurities enables me to takes the steps necessary to engage them in their learning
  • creating space for other options and possibilities that I may not have considered opens up learning for my students and for me
  • only teach students what they don’t know and can’t teach themselves
  • investing time in reflection empowers students to understand themselves as learners

Some of these understandings I have known and lived for a while, but in the last two months they have all  come together and as a result I have gained a different kind of clarity and my understanding of the familiar has grown.

On Friday we held a mini exhibition in Year 4 for the first time. To me it seemed like a logical culmination to our latest unit which falls under the transdisciplinary theme “How We Express Ourselves” (PYP).  Fortunately for me, my colleagues were open to the idea and prepared to go with the flow. Even more fortunately, our students loved the idea.

In the creative process leading up to this day, and in every opportunity that presented itself in other curriculum areas, I tried and tested (not always intentionally)  the changes I shared above.  I learned so much (as much from my mistakes as my successes) and have been so excited.

I felt it was time to write this post so that I could clarify my learning and capture the big understandings for my own benefit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ownership of learning – a big step forward!

The Inquiry Cycle  by Stephen Kemmis The Inquiry Cycle
by Stephen Kemmis.

I am participating in an action research project with a few other enthusiastic colleagues. The idea behind it is to inquire deeply through the cycle of noticing, reflecting and acting.

We are connecting our inquiry to our school’s learning principles. Thus far we have unpacked some of the learning principles, identified the area which really interests us, created our action research questions (these are refined on an ongoing basis), watched engaging youtube videos, referred to relevant blog posts and been highly engaged in thinking, questioning and discussion.

On Thursday it was my turn to share my process thus far. The protocol for sharing is: the speaker shares their process without being interrupted. Next, the members of the group respond through directing questions to the speaker and they are only allowed to ask questions. Following this kind of protocol puts all the focus on that individual’s inquiry and for me it was deeply satisfying and hugely encouraging. I left our session with an even stronger sense of clarity, purpose, motivation and was on high for the rest of the day.

This is the first time I have experienced a discussion taking place in this way and I found it to be an incredibly powerful tool for deepening thinking and eliciting possible areas for further investigation. I didn’t feel anxious or defensive and admired my colleagues’ restraint and commitment to the protocol as it is our tendency to have messy discussions (which are also great for promoting thinking and developing understanding).

What next…

1. I am refining my question for now as the original version incorporated several parts and the essence of my inquiry is clearly ownership of learning. Thus my question has been refined to:
How can I promote ownership of learning in my learners?

2. I realised the need for mindfulness on my part and planning with this intention in mind so I will be asking myself the question: “Who owns the learning?” all the time. I will also be using the Gradual release of responsibility continuum as a means to clarify who really is owning the learning in the learning engagements when planning.

3. I am going to notice and name the behaviour and highlight to my students and myself when ownership of learning is happening .

4. I am going to hand over control of the learning at the beginning of the lesson and set aside time at time at the end of the lesson for reflecting on what happened.

What happened later in the day…

I found myself consciously noticing and naming behaviours that demonstrated ownership of learning. As I was doing this I realised this is happening more than I initially thought. I also realised, once the students had gone home and I was reflecting on the day, that I had missed a few opportunities for naming ownership of learning and I can’t wait to start the day by celebrating those behaviours with my students.

What happened during the night…

I thought about the location lesson I had in mind for today and put it to the litmus test: “Who owns the learning?” Not my students.

What to do?…

As this is the start of a new numeracy unit I grappled with my concern that some of my students might not know enough to manage their learning and my genuine desire to hand over control. I thought back to Jocelyn’s observation that messy learning is learning and her reassurance that students find their way through the mess. I decided that this was a golden opportunity to believe in my students.

So, I have decided to re-schedule our guided reading session and give my students a big block of time (4 lessons today and more next week) so they can work at their pace to construct meaning according to their learning style.

I am trying to use the “flipped classroom” model as a guide for letting go.I came across this graphic on twitter last night and thought I would use it as a visual for my students when introducing the task.

The flipped classroom model.

What do I plan to do:

Ask an open question and set an open task:
What makes a map great? Show your thinking in any way you like.

Use what you have learned about maps to create your own map for visitors to our school to use to find their way from our reception to the kitchen garden.

I will let them decide if and when they want to collaborate. And, of course, I will let them decide everything else.

As I write this my excitement is growing exponentially and I can’t wait to hand over control.

Students teaching students – Part 2

How can I get my students to revisit their writing in a purposeful way and rework it to make it even more engaging?

I had been sitting with this question for a long while.

It then occured to me (again!!!) that if I valued this, I would need to set aside the time for this to happen.

I decided to use the students own work to promote good writing techniques as this would engage them more than examples from authors who are usually adults anyway. I wanted them to see that each student’s writing had elements in it that could be celebrated. I was also hoping that they would then see what they were capable of.

We started by referring back to their journal rubric. (My colleagues and I had put one together to give clear guidelines for what is required for a good journal text in Year 4.) Each student had been given their own copy of the rubric from the first journal writing session. When the rubric referred to descriptve words and imagery, we then looked for examples of this in their writing. Next we shared these and discussed the power of their descriptive words and images. When the rubric referred to writer’s voice (and defined what this meant) we then looked for examples of this in their writing and discussed their effect on the reader. And so on.

I was so excited by their response… they felt proud to share their efforts and were very appreciative of examples taken from their peers’ writing. And what’s even more exciting is – they enthusiastically asked for time to have another go at working on their piece to make it more engaging for the reader.

I can’t wait to read what they write…

Students teaching students… powerful learning for students and teachers.

Setting the scene…

Over the last four weeks, Charlie (a colleague) and I have been teaching “Time” to our Year 4 students. We realised from the pre-test that student understanding varied from very basic to extensive. We decided to combine our students to allow us to more successfully differentiate our teaching.

Differentiating across two classes really helped us to manage the learning. Charlie was able to consolidate and extend her group’s understanding of time. I was able differentiate within my group again and target teach to their needs. I was also able to work at a pace that suited all of my students. As different students grasped time I regrouped them again according to their needs.

Towards the end of the four weeks, Charlie’s group became very confident in all aspects of time and we decided to let them teach 24 hour time to my students. This would provide them with an opportunity to apply their learning in a meaningful way and would give my students an opportunity to have one-on-one teaching and guide the teaching by stating their needs.

Students teaching students

In discussion with Charlie, her students came up with the best ways they could think of to teach their peers. Some decided to do a pre-test to see what their peer already knew about 24 hour time and time in general. Several gathered concrete materials to use, such as mini clocks and mini whiteboards. Some created teaching aids. They prepared all of this in one 40 minute lesson. In the next lesson, we paired students up and the video shows the teaching and learning happening.

Student feedback demonstrated that they found this way of learning enjoyable and successful. They felt they learned a lot from each other by learning in this way.

What the students taught Charlie and I:

*It didn’t matter who paired up as they were so engaged in the experience.
*Purposeful learning happened for both the student teacher and the student being taught.
*Students know what works to support their teaching and the learning.
*Student teachers adapted to the needs of their student without needing to be told.
*Students applied many skills in addition to the mathematical ones.
*This was differentiation and target teaching at its best!!!
*Giving students ownership of their learning supports learning.

We should look for opportunities for students to teach students more often.

Big Ideas People

Image

Big Ideas People

“The biggest men and women with the biggest ideas can be shot down by the smallest men and women with the smallest minds.
Think big anyway” The Paradoxical Commandments by Dr KM Keith

I came across this quote the other morning and a part of me cringed and another part of me smiled in acknowledgment. At times in my professional life I have been a woman with a small minded approach.

I collaborate with a variety of colleagues who are more big idea thinkers than I am. I also come across big ideas people in my PLN. I no longer shoot down big ideas. If the big idea seems too big for our context/ circumstances I now look for a way to take the essence of the big idea and adapt it to the context.
Big ideas now excite me. Big ideas have led to many interesting, sometimes surprising discoveries and great moments in my teaching and in my students’ learning.

I have always been a reflective person but I am even more so now. Because of the insights and successes I have had from taking the time to notice and reflect and then take action from this, I am learning more and more and more.

Tuesday is a unit planning session – bring on the big ideas!

Drama is powerful for learning…

On Friday, we were lucky to have a drama expert come in and run workshops with each class. The aim of these sessions was to introduce and explore the concept of “systems”, provoke thinking, develop understanding and to have fun.

“What did you notice about the different systems you made today?”

Following the drama session, we had a quick chat about what they had noticed. I was blown away by the depth of their understanding of systems that resulted from the different tasks.

On Monday I decided to try a new thinking routine “One word, phrase and sentence” to assess individual understanding of systems following Friday’s drama provocation. Once we had clarified the difference between a phrase and a sentence they got on with it. Wow! Drama is definitely a great way to explore concepts and build conceptual understanding!!

This is how a few different students responded to the thinking routine:
Max
Word: systems
Phrase: parts rely on each other
Sentence: The parts rely on each other to make the system work.

Jake M
Word:Systems
Phrase:need parts to work other things
Sentence:A system needs parts to work with other parts to make something.

Lara:
Word: systems
Phrase: connected parts
Sentence: All the parts connect and then they work all together.

Cassie:
Word: system
Phrase: depending on each other
Sentence: Every part of a system relies on each other to be able to work properly.

I rarely use drama as I feel “unqualified” to run a session, but after observing and participating in this session I have realised the power that drama has for promoting learning. I also realised that not using drama is depriving learners who learn in this way of an opportunity to build conceptual understanding. Finally, I also realised that I don’t need to be an expert. All I need to be able to do is give clear instructions and hand over to the kids.